Psychologists, Social Workers, Counselors, MFTs

Alcoholism and Chemical Substance Abuse Dependency

 

This course meets the California pre-licensure requirement for Alcoholism and Chemical Substance Abuse Dependency (15 clock hours) for MFTs, LCSWs, and LPCCs.

This course is based on three CEmobile courses:

  • Treating Patients with Alcohol and Other Drug Problems: An Integrated Approach
  • Screening for Drug Use
  • Monitoring the Future.

Course Description: This course reviews the etiology of drug dependence, different methods of assessment, range of treatment approaches and the types of patients appropriate for them, and relapse prevention. This course addresses individual psychotherapy and family therapy as well as an updated overview of the treatment community (self-help and professional). It examines the basic assumptions and operating principles of various treatment venues to minimize the miscommunication that can occur when professionals collaborate on client care.

In addition, this course is intended to provide clinicians serving adult populations with the screening tools and procedures necessary to conduct screening, brief intervention, and/or treatment referral for clients who may have or be at risk of developing a substance use disorder.

Finally, the results from the national survey in the Monitoring the Future series on use of licit and illicit drugs by American teenagers are discussed and show that overall, the proportion of secondary school students in the country who used any illicit drug in the prior year fell significantly between 2015 and 2016. Considerably fewer teens reported using any illicit drug other than marijuana in the prior 12 months—5 percent, 10 percent and 14 percent in grades 8, 10 and 12, respectively than at any time since 1991.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the history of psychologists in the substance abuse field
  • Compare different models and theories that describe the addiction process
  • Analyze key issues for assessment of substance abuse and dependence
  • Analyze different treatment options and the selection process for substance abuse treatment
  • Analyze the role of individual psychotherapy plays in complementing substance abuse treatment
  • Describe how the therapist can support families during treatment process and the role of family therapy
  • Compare group therapy and self-help group options, including commonalities and differences
  • Describe various issues that impact relapse prevention
  • Describe the administration of the NIDA Quick Screen and NIDA-modified ASSIST
  • Describe the administration of a brief intervention to help clients learn about their drug use
  • Analyze the patterns of trends in use among 8th, 10th, and 12th graders for various licit and illicit substances in 2016, and compare to patterns from past years
  • Analyze the patterns of perceived risk among 8th, 10th, and 12th graders for various licit and illicit substances in 2016, and compare to patterns from past years
  • Analyze the patterns of disapproval among 8th, 10th, and 12th graders for various licit and illicit substances in 2016, and compare to patterns from past years
  • Analyze the patterns of availability among 8th, 10th, and 12th graders for various licit and illicit substances in 2016, and compare to patterns from past years

Course Components:

  • Textbook (NOT included, must be purchased separately by participant)
    - Required textbook: Robert D. Margolis and Joan E. Zweben. (2011). Treating Patients with Alcohol and Other Drug Problems: An Integrated Approach (2nd ed.). American Psychological Association.
    - Available at Amazon and other sources
  • Online text: Screening for Drug Use, and Monitoring the Future, 2016 (included)
  • Multiple choice online exam (included)
  • Electronic certificate of completion (free)

We allow you to obtain the textbook on your own to afford you greater flexibility. You can borrow from the library or a friend, or purchase a new or used copy for yourself or with a group of friends.

Course Credit(s): 15 CE Credits or Hours

Course Format: Book-Based and Online Text (format of this course is noninteractive)

Course Schedule: Self-paced

Course Author(s): Robert D. Margolis, PhD, and Joan E. Zweben, PhD; Lloyd D. Johnston, PhD, Patrick M. O’Malley, PhD, Richard A. Miech, PhD, Jerald G. Bachman, PhD, and John E. Schulenberg, PhD

Content Publisher(s): American Psychological Association; National Institute on Drug Abuse; Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan

Course Author(s) Qualifications:

Dr. Margolis is a licensed clinical psychologist and has specialized in adolescent addiction and substance abuse since 1977. He is the founder and executive director of Solutions Intensive Outpatient Program, a treatment program for adolescents in Roswell, Georgia. Dr. Margolis was director of psychological services at the Ridgeview Institute from 1984 to 1997. Dr. Margolis received his doctorate in clinical psychology from Georgia State University. He completed an APA-approved full-time predoctoral clinical psychology internship from Duke University's Department of Psychiatry/Division of Medical Psychology. He holds the APA College Certificate of Proficiency in the Treatment of Alcohol and Other Psychoactive Substance Use Disorders. Dr. Margolis has authored more than 15 articles and several book chapters on substance abuse and dependence.

Dr. Zweben is the founder and executive director of the 14th Street Clinic and Medical Group (1979–2007) and the East Bay Community Recovery Project (1989–present) in Oakland, California. The East Bay Community Recovery Project has been providing medical and psychosocial services to alcohol and other drug-dependent patients and their families and is a training site for graduate students and interns in the San Francisco Bay Area. Dr. Zweben received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Michigan. She is licensed in California, holds the APA College Certificate of Proficiency in the Treatment of Alcohol and Other Psychoactive Substance Use Disorders, and is a fellow of APA's Division 50 (Addictions). Dr. Zweben is the author of four books and more than 60 articles and book chapters and is the editor of 15 monographs on treating addiction. She is also health sciences clinical professor of psychiatry in the School of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

Lloyd D. Johnston, Ph.D.
Angus Campbell Collegiate Research Professor and University Distinguished Senior Research Scientist at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research and principal investigator of the Monitoring the Future study since its inception in 1975. A social psychologist by training, he has served as advisor to the White House, Congress, and many other national and international bodies and has conducted research on a wide range of issues, including the use of alcohol, tobacco, and various illicit drugs; institutional trust; policy evaluation; the functioning of American high schools; behaviors influencing the spread of HIV; and most recently, childhood obesity. His research interests also include international comparative studies and the application of survey research to social problems generally. He is the recipient of the 2012 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA).

Patrick M. O'Malley, Ph.D.
Research Professor at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research and co-principal investigator on the Monitoring the Future study. He received his Ph.D. degree in Psychology from the University of Michigan in 1975 and has been associated with the Monitoring the Future project since then. His publications deal with alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use and related attitudes and beliefs. His research interests include causes and consequences of drug use, driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, social epidemiology of drug use, and longitudinal survey data analysis techniques.

Richard A. Miech, Ph.D.
Research Professor at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research. He received his Ph.D. degree in Sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a MPH degree from Johns Hopkins University. His work focuses on trends in substance use, with an emphasis on disentangling how these trends vary by age, historical period, and birth cohort membership. Other research interests include identification of the factors that widen or narrow disparities in substance use over historical time, as well as the causes and consequences of substance use over the life course.

Jerald G. Bachman, Ph.D.
Research Professor and University Distinguished Research Scientist at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research and a principal investigator on the Monitoring the Future study since its inception in 1975. In 1965 he initiated the Youth in Transition project and has authored three books and many articles based on Monitoring the Future Research. His scientific publications focus on youth and social issues, and his current research interests include drug use and attitudes about drugs; other values, attitudes, and behaviors of youth; military plans and experiences; and public opinion as related to a number of other social issues.

John E. Schulenberg, Ph.D.
Research Professor, Institute for Social Research, and Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Michigan. He received his Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Studies from Penn State University. He has published widely on several topics concerning adolescence and the transition to adulthood, bringing a developmental perspective to understanding health risks and difficulties. He helps direct the NIDA-funded national Monitoring the Future study on the etiology and epidemiology of substance use, focusing on individual and contextual risk factors, course, co-morbidity, consequences, and historical variation across adolescence and adulthood. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and President of the Society for Research on Adolescence.

Course Level: Beginning/Introductory, Intermediate, Advanced

CEmobile, LLC, #1558, is approved as a provider for social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) www.aswb.org, through the Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. CEmobile, LLC maintains responsibility for the program. ASWB Approval Period: 5/2/2018-5/2/2021. Social workers should contact their regulatory board to determine course approval for continuing education credits.
Social workers participating in this course will receive 15 clinical continuing education clock hours.





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